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Eating Our Way Through... Canada's Atlantic Coast

Eating Our Way Through... Canada's Atlantic Coast


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When you say you spent a week in New Brunswick, most Americans will assume New Jersey, not realizing that there is a much more vacation-worthy spot about 700 miles north of “Hub City.” Often overlooked, this part of Canada’s Atlantic mainland shrinks in the presence of its Maritimes siblings, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island but – surprise – the province has all of the drama of those better-known locales... plus a little extra something.

Envision New Brunswick as Maine on steroids. Moose and blueberries? In abundance. Lobster? The town of Shediac is actually the self-proclaimed “Lobster Capital of the World.” So, yes.

Add to that New Brunswick’s legendary hospitality, so warm it’ll melt the frost from your cheeks after a day on the Bay of Fundy. With few major resorts, travelers opt for seaside inns or B&Bs in the highlands, and many of these offer incredible menus filled with locally farmed and freshly caught food that has more variety than the northern climes suggest.

A cozy inn that serves delicious food recalls a different era, when guests would change for dinner and mingle over aperitifs. Nostalgia is alive in New Brunswick, and for a weary traveler, the idea of heading downstairs for a meal of a lifetime and then back upstairs to sleep it off is very appealing.

During a road trip along the Fundy Coast to the Acadian Coast, three inns stood out for their inventive restaurants – Maison Tait in Shediac, Rossmount Inn in St. Andrews, and Tidal Watch Inn in St. Martins. Each offer cuisines accented by the European cultures that influence the Maritimes, like French, English and Irish. But many dishes also show off the province's abundance of seafood and fiercely local delicacies like fiddleheads and dulse, a dried red seaweed.

Setting it apart from Nova Scotia across the bay, New Brunswick’s Fundy Coast claims two of North America’s most stunning sights: Fundy National Park, a lush temperate rainforest, and the Hopewell Rocks. The rocks warrant two visits, one at high tide when the rocks peek out of 40 feet of water, and later when the tide goes out, pulling metric tons of water away from the shore and revealing bizarrely shaped rock towers and caves formed by the huge tides.

Breezy villages provide ballasts against the stark bay coast, among them St. Martins, a gateway to the scenic Fundy Trail and also a perfect starting point for a drive along the southern coast. The Tidal Watch Inn’s main building is a turn-of-the-century Victorian decorated with the chintz and tchotchkes of a proper English B&B. Warm and inviting, the dining room feels like a rich auntie’s parlor. That is, if she harvested herbs from her garden and went to the fishmonger for the black tiger shrimp with fire-roasted peppers we ordered on a chilly, damp night.

The food is homey and prettily presented, but where the Tidal Watch Inn’s dishes comfort, the Rossmount Inn’s edge diners away from their comfort zones. Just outside of St. Andrews-by-the-sea, a charming resort town made popular during the Gilded Age, Rossmount Inn is Great Gatsby elegant. Linens are crisp and white, striped pool towels are plush, the moody bar is wood-paneled, and the dining is the cat’s meow.

Chef Chris Aerni, who runs the place with wife Graziella, designs an innovative, changing menu using produce from the organic kitchen garden as well as locally sourced meat and fish. A sample from this summer’s menu? A cucumber gazpacho with watermelon and nasturtium coulis, organic hemp oil, sour cream, chives and dill followed by a coriander-crusted seared tuna loin with preserved lemon vinaigrette, green-purple potato salad, organic extra virgin olive oil and espelette pepper.

In a face-off with Prince Edward Island across the Northumberland Strait, the Acadian Coast diverges from the Fundy when it comes to cultural influence. While the towns on the Fundy were colonized by the British Isles, the Acadian culture is French Cajun -- the same as Louisiana's.

Northern towns like Shediac are primarily French-speaking but the “laissez le bon temps roulez” attitude we know so well from New Orleans definitely informs the region's Francophile food. The Maison Tait House takes a Victorian house circa 1911 and turns it into a refined village inn close enough to the water to catch salty bay breezes. Four poster beds and working fireplaces promise a plush night, but the Tait House kitchen provides the real excitement.

Executive Chef Chris MacAdam stays true to the local cuisine’s focus on seafood and French flavors but elevates hearty dishes with offbeat ingredients, adding Tahitian lime to a scallop and crab appetizer or serving soba noodles with an Acadian pepper-smoked duck breast.

It’s worth noting that Shediac crowns itself “The Lobster Capital of the World,” celebrating its big export every summer during a lobster festival. We recommend you skip the kids’ festivities and head out on one of the lobster cruises for some of the freshest crustacean on the Atlantic coast.

Whether whale watching on the Fundy, hiking in a rainforest or sitting down to a five-course meal, there are dozens of ways to experience New Brunswick's unique blend of friendliness and seafaring rusticity.

If your idea of bliss is shacking up at a small inn and eating your way through a vacation, we’ve put together some suggestions for 10 places that don’t skimp on the bed or the breakfast.


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily


Canadian

The time has never been better for a cookbook that focuses on the unique foods of Canada’s Atlantic terroir. Steeped in culinary tradition, yet bursting with contem­porary cuisine, these provinces offer a wealth of locally grown and artisanally pro­duced foods common across the region. For years, these were provinces of industry, but times have changed: the coal mines have closed and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland no longer teem with cod. Today agri-tourism and grassroots food production, led by young creatives, have become the new face of the region’s culinary scene, and the region is undergoing an edible renaissance while still managing to stay tethered to tradition. Young innovative chefs and food purveyors are choosing to call these provinces home, build businesses here, and create a renewed food industry that stands firm in its unique culinary heritage while looking forward to a local, sustainable, and very modern spot on Canada’s burgeoning food scene . . .

. . . The question of why two West Coasters would write a book focused on Atlantic Canada is one that we considered deeply while dreaming up this project. The answer is quite simple: we have a love for the place, the people who live there, and the producers and foods that define the culinary scene.

This book is the culmination of an incredible journey through the Atlantic Coast’s terroir and its culinary renaissance, ultimately bringing Atlantic food traditions to your home, and introducing you to some of the people who make it all possible. And what a journey it was: over half a year on the road, countless interviews, hours of research, intro­ductions to people we now count as friends, and innumerable meals that will forever live in our memories. We foraged for mushrooms, berries, and wild herbs in Newfoundland, watched the sun rise over oyster beds in Prince Edward Island, explored Nova Scotia from the Annapolis Valley to the top of the Cabot Trail, and fished for sturgeon on the great Saint John River in New Brunswick. We travelled for over forty-eight hours from our homes in Vancouver to the Fogo Island Inn—off the northwest coast of Newfoundland—by planes, trains, automobile, and ferry—and it was worth every minute! . . . In every corner of the great Atlantic coast, our hearts filled to overflowing with an even deeper love and respect for the place, the people, and, of course, the food.

A Rising Tide begins with an overview of Atlantic Canada’s culinary influences and current trends. We’ve provided a list of items that make it easy to bring the tastes of the East Coast into your kitchen, but since some of these recipes involve hyper-local and incredibly seasonal ingredients—from sweet gale and lovage to primrose and Jonah crab—we’ve offered you substitution ideas so you can make these recipes regardless of where you are. While we recommend using as many of the local foods listed in the recipes as you can, we have also recommended ingredient substitutions to ensure the results are tasty no matter what is available to you.

Each province has its own chapter with recipes for every meal of the day, and most also have drink pairings. They are a mix of our own recipes, inspired by our travels, and recipes contributed by local chefs. You’ll also find stories and essays featuring ingredients fairly common across the entire region and known to define the province. Finally, at the end of the book, there are menus for every season, just in case you’re craving a beachside picnic or a winter warm-up brunch. Our desire for this book is that you’ll come to know the individual provinces as well as understand the collective cultural experiences they share.

This book is a testament to the chefs and home cooks of the region. It is for those who call this place home and for the visitors who love the people, the place, and, most notably, the foods. We invite you to ride along with us as we set sail to the wilds of Newfoundland, drive slowly through the pastoral beauty of Prince Edward Island, hit the burgeoning craft restaurant scene in New Brunswick, and stand silently in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to marvel at the simple scent of apples baking on the earth. We hope this book will live in your kitchen and be covered in handwritten notes and coffee rings, all while you travel along with us through scenic Atlantic Canada.
—Danielle and Emily



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